Twitpic, says goodbye on september 25th

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Long before Twitter had its own built-in image hosting service, there was Twitpic. The image host was launched in 2008 and has been a prominent Twitter tool ever since, but the company has announced today that it’s closing its doors on September 25th. According to the blog post, Twitter is to blame for Twitpic’s untimely demise.

Twitpic was one of the first services to offer an easy way to upload an image and get a shortened URL link that was perfect for stuffing into Twitter’s 140 character limit. Other services offering a similar service have appears, and Twitter has its own option as well.

Twitpic founder Noah Everett says the closure comes as a result of a trademark dispute. Twitpic filed for a trademark on its name back in 2009, and has spent the intervening years dealing with all the legal hurdles necessary to convince the USPTO that the mark was valid. The company recently succeeded in getting its application approved and had the application published. This is what’s known as the “published for opposition” phase. Twitter was apparently happy to offer some opposition. News

twitpic

Long before Twitter had its own built-in image hosting service, there was Twitpic. The image host was launched in 2008 and has been a prominent Twitter tool ever since, but the company has announced today that it’s closing its doors on September 25th. According to the blog post, Twitter is to blame for Twitpic’s untimely demise.

Twitpic was one of the first services to offer an easy way to upload an image and get a shortened URL link that was perfect for stuffing into Twitter’s 140 character limit. Other services offering a similar service have appears, and Twitter has its own option as well.

Twitpic founder Noah Everett says the closure comes as a result of a trademark dispute. Twitpic filed for a trademark on its name back in 2009, and has spent the intervening years dealing with all the legal hurdles necessary to convince the USPTO that the mark was valid. The company recently succeeded in getting its application approved and had the application published. This is what’s known as the “published for opposition” phase. Twitter was apparently happy to offer some opposition.

Twitter contacted Twitpic and asked the company to abandon its trademark application, presumably because ‘Twitpic” sounds like something that would be part of the actual Twitter service. Twitter also implied that if it did not comply, Twitpic would be cut off from the Twitter API, instantly killing its service. Everett says Twitpic was not in a position to offer a legal challenge to a company with Twitter’s resources, so the only option was to shut down. Granted, this seems like an odd decision to come to, but I’d wager there are a few elements that have not been publicly disclosed. Perhaps it makes more sense when you have all the facts.

So what about all those images you’ve posted to Twitpic over the years? The blog post says there will be a tool for users to export all their images and videos soon, but all the Twitpic links out there will stop working on September 25th.

Margaret Soto

Soy aficcionada a los softwares y apps que te resuelven tus complicaciones del día a día, soy fan del click a lo que voy descubriendo cositas interesantes para compartirlas.

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